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November 2012 - TOOTSIFELT, TOOTBIFELT, and TOOTDIFERT

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John A. Kline, PhD jkline@klinespeak.com
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Dr. John KlineIn May 2004 I wrote a column on “How to state your objective.” At that time I said the objective of any talk should tell the specific response you want from your audience members—what you expect them to know feel, or do as a result of listening to you.

TOOTSIFELT. I went on to describe the TOOTSIFELT method I had developed. I said to start this way. “The objective of this speech is for each listener to . . . . “ (TOOTSIFELT). Since that time I have validated the TOOTSIFELT method with hundreds of college students and have taught it to many corporate audiences. Furthermore, many others have learned the method through reading my book, Speaking Effectively: Achieving Excellence in Presentations.

TOOTBIFELT. The method worked so well that I adapted it to briefings. For many years, briefings have been the most used method of oral presentation in military settings; but briefings have since gained popularity in the corporate world where the speaker must present information accurately, briefly, and clearly. Introductions and conclusions to briefings are short and simple, and the message gets to the point quickly without unnecessary words. Clear listener-centered objectives are especially important with briefings. Write your objective this way: “The objective of this briefing is for each listener to . . . . “ Your objective is not to tell listeners something; your objective is for each listener to know, feel, or do something.

TOOTDIFERT. The method worked so well with oral presentations, that several years ago I adapted the method to written communication and have taught it to thousands of college students and individuals in corporate audiences. State your objectives for written communication like this: “The objective of this document is for each reader to . . . . ” Notice that the TOOTDIFERT acronym, as with the two acronyms for oral or spoken communication, focuses on individuals and not the collective audience. Both writers and speakers reach one person at a time, even if the audience is large.

The method may seem cutesy, but it works. Try it!

John Kline
Montgomery, Alabama
jkline@klinespeak.com

November 2012 - TOOTSIFELT, TOOTBIFELT, and TOOTDIFERT
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